Research

Testosterone replacement therapy, or TRT, can reduce men’s risk of depression, boost libido, and help prevent cardiovascular disease. How do we know? Science.

Scientists have been researching both the benefits of TRT and the risks of low testosterone levels for decades. Their findings demonstrate that low testosterone is associated with a number of serious health risks — and that TRT can help reduce these risks while improving physical and mental wellbeing.

Low testosterone and TRT studies have been published in major medical research journals. Take a look at what some of the leading testosterone experts are saying.

Benefits Of TRT

“Based on the current status of TRT, the majority of studies indicate that TRT is safe and is associated with the prevention of [cardiovascular disease] and strokes in hypogonadal men.”
Hospital Practice, March 1, 2018, Chrysant SG et al

“Testosterone therapy consistently improved self-reported walking ability…”
The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, November 1, 2018, Bhasin S et al

“[Tesosterone therapy] has also shown consistent benefit in improving libido in men with low testosterone levels at baseline…”
Current Opinion in Urology, November 2017, Rizk PJ et al

“These results suggest that testosterone treatment might improve depressed mood in older men who have low levels of bioavailable testosterone.”
The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, February 1, 1999, Barrett-Connor E et al

“Testosterone replacement therapy in patients with testosterone deficiency and type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or metabolic syndrome has shown reductions in insulin resistance, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides and improvement in glycemic control and anthropometric parameters.”
Medicina ClinicaJanuary 15, 2016, Fernández-Miró M et al (in Spanish)

Risks Of Low Testosterone

“Many studies have shown that low testosterone levels have been associated with increased risk for cardiovascular events, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and strokes.”

Hospital Practice, March 1, 2018, Chrysant SG et al

“Men with low [total testosterone] and [free testosterone] were more likely to have slow walking speed, difficulty climbing stairs, or frailty and diabetes than those with normal levels.”

The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, June 22, 2011, Bhasin S et al

“Hypogonadal men showed an increased incidence of depressive illness and a shorter time to diagnosis of depression ”

JAMA Psychiatry February 2004, Molly M. Shores et al

“Low testosterone levels are associated with increased insulin resistance, increase in fat mass, low HDL cholesterol, higher triglyceride levels and hypertension.”

Medicina ClinicaJanuary 15, 2016, Fernández-Miró M et al (in Spanish)

“Bioavailable testosterone levels were 17% lower for the 25 men with categorically defined depression than levels observed in all other men.”

The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, February 1, 1999, Barrett-Connor E et al